Although toddlers develop at different paces, this colorful chart shows you which cognitive, motor, communication and social skills to expect — and when you might expect them.

All babies have their own timetables, but you can watch for certain developments. Celebrate as your toddler reaches or nears these developmental milestones.

C=Cognitive

M=Motor

C=Communication

S=Social

9 Months

C

  • Recognizes people and objects at a distance

  • Recognizes and responds to familiar words

M

  • Holds an object in each hand

  • Scoots or begins to crawl

C

  • Looks for and reacts to sounds outside line of visione

  • Babbles echo actual words with vowels & consonants

S

  • Distinguishes between strangers and family

  • Shows frustration when limits are set and tests limits

10 Months

C

  • Understands how to use many objects

  • Expanding attention span, from two to three minutes at 8 months to 15 minutes at 12 months

M

  • Rolls over quickly and suddenly. Crawls

  • Sits up unsupported for long periods. May stand

C

  • Recognizes own name

  • Shakes head or frowns to express “no”

S

  • Accurately mimics expressions and sounds

  • Enjoys being around other babies (but can’t yet play)

11 Months

C

  • Understands that objects have names

  • Is attracted to novelty (new toys, objects)

M

  • Points and pokes with index finger

  • May stand alone briefly

C

  • Gestures to communicate

  • Understands many things said to her

S

  • Imitates actions of adults and other children

  • Waves good-bye

12 Months

C

  • Looks and listens simultaneously

  • Follows one-step commands (“Lift your arm”)

M

  • Crawls up stairs

  • May take first steps or even walk

C

  • Responds to simple questions and one-step commands

  • May use “Ma ma” and “Da da” to refer to parents

S

  • Shows separation anxiety when you leave the room

  • Shows increased affection with family

12-15 Months

C

  • Actively explores objects by touching and moving

  • Points to objects you name (his nose, pictures in a book)

M

  • Starts taking first solo steps or may even walk fairly well

  • Climbs up stairs; scoots down

C

  • Uses at least one to two words around first birthday

  • Responds to questions and requests (Want more?)

S

  • Shows preferences for certain people and things

  • May say “no” to express frustration

15-18 Months

C

  • Puts objects in and takes them out of containers

  • Imitates real life in play (feeding a doll, sweeping)

M

  • Climbs on furniture, possibly out of her crib

  • Removes some clothing; helps when being dressed

C

  • Uses a single word as a sentence (ex: Juice.)

  • Understands concepts of up, down, off, and hot

S

  • Gets easily frustrated

  • Increasingly understands that she’s a separate person from you with her own preferences, feelings, and ideas

18-21 Months

C

  • Knows how household items are used (a spoon to eat)

  • Points to at least one body part when asked

M

  • Jumps in place or from a bottom step to the floor

  • Walks and pulls a pull‐to

C

  • May say up to 30 words, 18 months

  • Tries longer, multi‐syllable words

S

  • May have tantrums when upset (tantrums peak between 18 and 24 months)

  • May have quick emotional shifts

21-24 Months

C

  • Names simple objects in a book

  • Follows two‐step requests

M

  • Walks with balance along curbs or logs

  • Able to turn knobs, push buttons and turn pages

C

  • Uses simple phrases or puts words together (“all gone”)

  • May refer to self by name instead of saying “I“

S

  • Makes broad, often quick emotional shifts

  • Becomes more interested in playing with other children

24-36 Months

C

  • Figures out simple mechanical toys

  • Completes puzzles of three or four pieces

M

  • Runs with more coordination. Jumps

  • Learns to kick a ball

C

  • Uses pronouns (I, we, you)

  • Says name, age, and gender

S

  • Plays with other children rather than just side‐by‐side

  • Understands the concept of possessives (mine, hers)