Baby Poop Guide for Parents

      Baby Poop Guide for Parents

      The color, texture and amount of your baby’s poop can change over the first few months. Check out this baby poop guide for some things you may notice.

       


      Breastfed
      Green

      GREEN/BLACK, TAR-LIKE:

      A newborn’s first poop usually consists of a thick, black or dark green substance called meconium. It’s good that they’re passing this and getting it out of their system.

      Breastfed
      Yellow Green

      YELLOW/GREEN, SEEDY:

      After the meconium is passed, the poop color of breastfed infants can look mustard yellow with seed-like particles, although it can also appear green. There is a lot of variation between babies on the number of times they have a bowel movement. A very soft, sometimes even watery poop can be normal for breastfed infants too.

      Formula Fed
      Yellow Brown

      YELLOWISH-BROWN/BROWN-GREEN/LIGHT BROWN:

      Formula-fed poop is soft but better formed than the poops of breastfed babies. Your baby’s poop color may range from yellowish-brown to light brown.

      Dark Green

      DARK GREEN:

      More than likely, your baby’s iron supplement or iron-fortified formula is making their stool dark green, dark brown or black.

      Eating Solids
      Dark Brown

      DARK BROWN WITH VARIOUS COLORS:

      When your baby begins eating solid food, their poops might become dark brown—although seemingly odd colors are possible as well. For example, your baby’s poop color might look red after they eat beets or might contain streaks of dark blue after they eat blueberries. Or, you might also find chunks of undigested food in your baby’s poops.

      Call Your Pediatrician
      Black

      BLACK:

      If the harmless causes have been eliminated (meconium, iron supplements), then black, tarry poop could indicate that there may be blood in your baby’s upper GI tract.

      Red

      RED:

      If the harmless causes (beets, food coloring) are not present, red streaks in the diaper may indicate blood in the poop. It’s better to check with your pediatrician than to worry about it.

      White

      WHITE:

      If poop is white, then bile is not reaching the poop, either because it is not being made by the liver or because something is blocking it from getting to the small intestine.

       

      If you have any concerns about your baby’s poop, talk to your pediatrician. Keep in mind:

      • If your baby’s poop is consistently watery, call your pediatrician if it lasts more than 24 hours.
      • If your baby is consistently producing dark, hard poops, contact your pediatrician.