A formula-fed infant who has cow’s milk allergy needs a formula that is hypoallergenic, meaning it has been specially designed to not cause allergic reactions.

You should talk with your doctor about your baby’s formula options. The most commonly recommended hypoallergenic formula types for infants with cow’s milk allergy are extensively hydrolyzed formulas and amino acid-based formulas.

Meeting the Nutritional Needs of Your Growing Baby with Nutramigen® or PurAmino™ Formula

The Nutramigen Difference

Since its introduction more than 70 years ago as the first hypoallergenic infant formula for the dietary management of cow’s milk allergy, Nutramigen is now a world’s leading cow’s milk allergy product for infants.1 Nutramigen infant formula has been clinically proven in more than 70 studies, making it the most scientifically-supported extensively hydrolyzed formula on the market.2 In fact, Nutramigen has been clinically demonstrated to manage colic due to cow’s milk allergy fast—often within 48 hours.3

Like all infant formula products sold in the United States, Nutramigen formulas for infants with cow’s milk allergy are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). You can be assured that these hypoallergenic formulas meet the same nutritional standards as routine infant formulas.

Nutramigen® with Enflora™ LGG® is nutritionally complete. Nutramigen with Enflora LGG is designed to serve as a sole source of nutrition for infants up to six months and as a major source of nutrition through 12 months.

Key Nutrients Provided by Nutramigen

Studies suggest that children with cow’s milk allergy may be at risk of not getting enough key nutrients—including fat, protein, calcium, and vitamin D—when they start eating dairy-free solid foods.4 Nutramigen formula has the nutrients a growing baby needs, so you should continue with these formulas for as long as your doctor recommends. Here is a look at key nutrients provided by Nutramigen with Enflora LGG hypoallergenic formula for infants with cow’s milk allergy.

Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)

Nutramigen® Powder was the first hypoallergenic infant formula to contain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a widely-studied probiotic shown to improve digestive health in infants with cow’s milk allergy. Research suggests that this healthful bacteria helps infants with cow’s milk allergy build tolerance fast to cow’s milk protein. A study showed that after 12 months on a diet of Nutramigen with Enflora LGG, 81 percent of babies with cow’s milk allergy had built tolerance to cow’s milk protein.5

Previous research suggested that children may not develop a tolerance to cow’s milk protein until age five6,7,8. In addition, LGG helps support gastrointestinal health. Colic due to cow’s milk allergy often stops within 48 hours after a switch to Nutramigen.

 

Nutrition from Nutramigen

1. Fats

Nutramigen manages colic due to CMA in nearly all infants within 48 hours

During digestion, fats get broken down into fatty acids and then absorbed. They serve as a major source of energy for your baby and aid in the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins such as A, D, E, and K. DHA and ARA are fatty acids that support brain and eye development in infants. Nutramigen was the first hypoallergenic formula brand to have the same amounts of these fatty acids as found in breast milk (0.32 percent of total fatty acids as DHA and 0.64 percent of total fatty acids as ARA).* An adequate intake for total fat for infants ages 0 – 6 months is 31 grams per day. An adequate intake for total fat for infants ages 7 – 12 months is 30 grams per day.9

*Average level of DHA and ARA in worldwide breast milk is 0.32% ± 0.22% and 0.47% +/- 0.13% (mean ± standard deviation of total fatty acids) based on an analysis of 65 studies of 2,474 women.

2. Protein10

Proteins are composed of amino acids, and help build, maintain and repair tissues of the skin, eyes, muscles, heart, lungs, brain and other organs. It is also important for enzymes, hormones and antibodies. An adequate intake for infants aged 0 to 6 months is 9.1 grams of protein per day. Infants aged 7 to 12 months should get 11 grams of protein per day.

3. Carbohydrates11

Carbohydrates provide energy to the body. They fuel your baby’s body functions and activity, as well as support efficient use of proteins and fats. The carbohydrate blend in Nutramigen formula is easily digested and well tolerated by infants with cow’s milk allergy. An adequate intake for infants aged 0 to 6 months is 60 grams of carbohydrates per day. An adequate intake for infants aged 7 to 12 months is 95 grams of carbohydrates per day.

4. Calcium12

Calcium helps builds strong bones and teeth. Children with cow’s milk allergy who are eating dairy-free solid foods may be at risk of not getting enough daily bone-building calcium.13 With Nutramigen and PurAmino formulas, you can be sure your baby is getting calcium his growing body needs. An adequate intake for infants aged 0 to 6 months is 200 milligrams (mg) of calcium per day. An adequate intake for infants aged 7 to 12 months is 260 mg of calcium per day.

5. Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps your baby absorb calcium and phosphorous and build bone. Because breast milk is low in vitamin D, it’s recommended that breastfed infants age 0 to 12 months get 400 international units (IU) of supplemental vitamin D per day.14 Formula-fed infants should be given 400 IU of daily supplemental vitamin D when their formula intake is less than 32 fluid ounces (1 quart) per day.15

6. Vitamin E16

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that helps protect fatty acids from oxidation. An adequate intake for infants aged 0 to 6 months is 4 milligrams (mg) of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) per day. An adequate intake for infants aged 7 to 12 months is 5 mg of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) per day.

7. Iron17

Iron helps support brain development and the formation of healthy blood cells. Iron deficiency may result in anemia. Infants with anemia may be lethargic because they don't have enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen to their tissues. Other signs of anemia in infants can include poor appetite, insufficient weight gain and developmental delays. An adequate intake for infants aged 0 to 6 months (based on average breast milk intake) is 0.27 milligrams (mg) of iron per day. Infant formulas provide more iron per fluid ounce than breast milk because of absorption differences. Infants aged 7 to 12 months should get 11 mg of iron per day.

8. Zinc18

Zinc is important for tissue formation. It also helps support the immune system. Zinc deficiency is associated with impaired growth. An adequate intake for infants aged 0 to 6 months is 2 milligrams (mg) of zinc per day. Infants aged 7 to 12 months need 3 mg of zinc per day.

9. Choline

Choline is an essential nutrient found in breast milk that, like DHA, is important to the development of your baby’s brain. Infants who are fed Nutramigen get a level of choline that is designed to be close to the level found in breast milk. An adequate intake for infants aged 0 to 6 months is 125 milligrams (mg) of choline per day. An adequate intake for infants aged 7 to 12 months is 150 mg of choline per day.19

* LGG is a registered trademark of Chr. Hansen A/S.
 
 

References

  1. http://journal-blog.meadjohnson.com/2012/03/celebrating-70-years-of-nutritional-success/; https://www.enfamil.com/products/nutramigen-enflora-lgg (under "Nutramigen celebrates 70 years")
  2. http://journal-blog.meadjohnson.com/2012/03/celebrating-70-years-of-nutritional-success/;
  3. Lothe L, et al. Pediatrics. 1989; 83: 262-266.
  4. Christie L, et al. J Am Diet Assoc. 2002; 102: 1648-51; Henricksen C, et al. Acta Paeditr. 2000; 89: 272-278.
  5. Berni Canani R et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012; 129: 580-582.
  6. Wood RA. Pediatrics. 2003;111:1631-1637.
  7. Host A et al. Allergy. 1990;45:587-596.
  8. Bishop JM et al. J Pediatr. 1990;116:862-867.
  9. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. Washington, D. C.: National Academy Press; 2005.
  10. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2005.
  11. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2005.
  12. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2011.
  13. Christie L, et al. J Am Diet Assoc. 2002; 102: 1648-51; Henricksen C, et al. Acta Paeditr. 2000; 89: 272-278.
  14. Wagner CL, et al. J Pediatr. 2008; 122: 1142-1152.
  15. ibid
  16. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium and Carotenoids. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2000.
  17. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2001.
  18. ibid
  19. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1998.