Help Center & FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Breastfeeding

At what rate will I gain weight during my pregnancy, and how much weight can I expect to gain?

Weight gain is usually slow during the first 3 months. After this, your baby begins to grow more quickly. Although everyone is different, here is a guideline of what you can expect.

  • First Trimester: 1 to 4 pounds total during the first 3 months
  • Second and Third Trimesters: 2 to 4 pounds per month during the 4th to 9th months (second and third trimesters)

On average, you may gain a total of 25 to 35 pounds during your pregnancy if you started in a healthy weight range. Underweight women may need to gain more to store extra energy. If you started out a bit heavier, you may need to gain a little less.

Related: Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain

Can I still produce enough milk for my baby if I have small breasts?

Whether you're a B or a double D, it's possible to make enough milk to feed your baby. Nature designed a perfect supply-and-demand system. The more your baby stimulates your breasts by sucking, the more milk you'll produce. So even if your baby is in a growth spurt and nursing more often, your body will "keep up." Remember, mothers of twins and even triplets can have enough milk supply to breastfeed successfully.

Related: Breastfeeding Secrets: What No One Tells You

Do you have any products designed specifically for breastfeeding moms?

For you, mom, we offer our Enfamil® Expecta® Prenatal Dietary Supplement. Expecta® Prenatal is a complete dietary supplement to be used before conception, during pregnancy, and while breastfeeding to help support you and your baby's needs. It has Choline, DHA, and folic acid to help support brain and nervous system development, and other important nutrients* 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

The effects of DHA on infant brain and eye development have been studied using range of methods and different sources of DHA including fish oils and DHA derived from algae (which is the source used in Expecta). The chemical structure of DHA is the same, regardless of which of these sources is used. For more information, consult your physician.

Related: Supplementing with Formula Feeding

How can I keep breastfeeding when I go back to work?

Many women manage the breastfeeding/working schedule with a little planning. Whether you go back to work full-time or part-time, you can develop a breastfeeding routine that works for you and your baby. Here's a schedule that many moms follow:

  • Nurse early in the morning, right after your baby wakes up.
  • Nurse again just before you leave for work.
  • Pump your breast milk two or three times during the workday. Store it in a refrigerator and bring it home in an insulated cooler with ice packs to feed your baby the next day.
  • Have your child-care provider feed your baby the stored breast milk during the day.
  • Nurse your baby as soon as you get home from work or pick her up from child care.
  • Nurse during the evening.

Related: Breast Pumping at Work

How can I relieve engorged breasts?

You may feel a little fullness if your milk comes in very quickly the first few days after birth. This is normal.Your breasts may swell, and feel uncomfortably full. Excessive engorgement, however, may be painful.

Tips: 

  • To avoid engorgement, feed your baby often, and throughout the night. Let him nurse for 10-20 minutes on each breast.
  • If you still feel pain, express some of the milk with a breast pump. Or try releasing it manually by massaging your breast, then compressing it just outside the areola (Try doing this in the shower).
  • To help relieve severe engorgement, try cold packs, crushed ice in a plastic bag or cold cloths between feedings. Keep hot water away from your breasts while showering.
  • If you're still in pain after a day or so, call your doctor or lactation consultant about this issue and any other breastfeeding questions you may have.

Related: How to Avoid Common Breastfeeding Issues

How can I tell if my baby has had enough to eat?

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is she gaining weight steadily? Your doctor can confirm this.
  • Does she wet six or more diapers and have at least one bowel movement every 24 hours?
  • Is she nursing at least eight times (and up to 12 times) every 24 hours during her first month?
  • Do your breasts feel softer and "empty" after nursing?
  • Does your baby swallow after sucking a few times during her feeding?

How will breastfeeding feel?

When your baby takes your nipple, along with the areola, into his mouth and begins to suck, the sensations you feel cause a reflex called let-down. This signals your breasts to release milk. You may feel a little tingling or surging sensation when your milk lets down. You might feel slight discomfort at first, but if he latches on properly, you should not feel pain. If you do, he's probably not latched on properly.

Problems with Let-Down

If you're distracted, tired, stressed, anxious, embarrassed or have pain in your breasts, your milk may not let down.

Tips:

  • Get some rest.
  • Nurse in privacy, and try to release your mind of stressful thoughts and obligations during feeding time.
  • Spend a few moments looking into your baby's beautiful eyes, and let nature take its course.
  • If breast pain is a problem, work with your lactation consultant to review positions and latching on.

Leaking

This possibly embarrassing situation happens to all of us. For some, just thinking about their baby is enough to turn on the milk machine.

Tips:

  • Apply pressure to your nipples directly with your thumb and index finger.
  • Try crossing your arms tightly across your chest.
  • And wear absorbent breast pads in your bra.

Related: Breastfeeding Secrets: What No One Tells You

I am a breastfeeding mom; do you have any products designed for me and my baby?

For you, mom, we offer our Enfamil® Expecta® Prenatal Dietary Supplement. Expecta Prenatal is a complete dietary supplement to be used before conception, during pregnancy and while breastfeeding to help support you and your baby’s needs. It has Choline and DHA to help support baby’s brain development in addition to folic acid for brain and nervous system development and other important nutrients.*†

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 

The effects of DHA on infant brain and eye development have been studied using range of methods and different sources of DHA including fish oils and DHA derived from algae (which is the source used in Expecta). The chemical structure of DHA is the same, regardless of which of these sources is used. For more information, consult your physician.

Related: Tips for a Healthy Breastfeeding Diet

What are the benefits of formula-feeding my baby?

Formula not only meets your baby's basic nutrition requirements, it also provides the nutrients your baby needs for his growth and development. Formula-feeding also allows Dad and other family members or friends to feed and bond with your baby, and for Mom to have a little break. And some parents just feel more comfortable with formula-feeding.

Related: Breastfeeding vs Formula-Feeding: 6 Common Myths Every Parent Should Know

What are the breastfeeding benefits for moms?

Breast milk has nutrients your baby needs. It helps protect your baby from many illnesses, and it's easily digested. For you, it's convenient and economical. You can feed your baby anytime, anywhere. You may need to buy bottles or nipples if you plan to express milk and bottle-feed your baby now and then. 

Related: Breastfeeding Secrets: What No One Tells You

What if my breastfed baby wants to nurse more often than the four-hour schedule suggests?

Your newborn's stomach is small. That's why many experts recommend feeding "on demand." At first, your newborn may breastfeed every two to three hours, or eight to 12 times in a 24-hour period.

If your newborn sleeps more than three hours between feedings, ask your baby's doctor about waking her to nurse. She needs the nourishment, and your breasts need the stimulation to continue to produce milk.

By the way, the four-hour schedule should arrive as your baby gets a little older.

Related: Newborn Formula Feeding Schedule

What is mastitis?

Mastitis is a breast infection. It can start out as a plugged duct that gets infected, and it may cause temperature, aches, and fatigue.

To help relieve plugged ducts, massage your breasts focusing on the firm area before each feeding. Then nurse your baby right afterward and try to drain the affected breast.

To avoid mastitis, empty your breasts regularly, avoid tight clothing, and try to stay rested. If you do get a breast infection, call your doctor at once. You may need an antibiotic, but you probably won't have to wean your baby. Follow your doctor's advice.

Related: Resources

What's the right way to breastfeed?

Have your nurse or lactation consultant help you with positions to hold your baby for feeding. Hold your breast with a “C” hold, your thumb above the breast and your four fingers supporting your breast underneath. Make sure your fingers are positioned away from the areola, so your breast can go far into your baby's mouth. Tickle your baby's lower lip to get him to open his mouth. Once he opens wide, pull him close and place his open mouth fully on your breast.

Sore Nipples

Some nipple tenderness is normal during the first days of breast feeding. But if your nipples become sore or cracked, this can hurt.

Tips:

To avoid this, be sure your baby is latched on properly. He should be sucking on your breast and your nipple should be far back in his mouth. Talk to your lactation consultant if you're not sure.

To help relieve this - 

  • Avoid excessive moisture between feedings.
  • Let your nipples air-dry.
  • Don't use nursing pads with plastic liners, which can trap moisture.
  • Lotions or lanolin can help, once the nipple is dry.
  • Try alternating breasts for a few feedings until the condition improves.
  • Also, wash your breasts with warm water and avoid soap, which can be drying.

If the condition doesn't improve, check with your doctor or lactation consultant about this issue and any other breastfeeding questions you may have.

Related: How to Breastfeed

When can I start breastfeeding?

Soon after birth. At first, your baby will receive not breast milk but colostrum, a yellowish fluid full of antibodies, protective cells and nourishment. Once your milk comes in, he will get both protein-rich foremilk and high-fat hind milk.

Related: Newborn Nursing by the Numbers

When is the right time to switch my baby from breast milk or formula to cow’s milk?

Cow’s milk can be introduced at the age of 1 year.  According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, babies should not be fed cow's milk before their first birthday, which includes whole, reduced-fat (2 percent) or fat-free (skim) milk.

Although milk is appropriate for older children, it is not recommended for infants during the important first year of life. The nutritional profile of cow’s milk differs from that of breast milk or infant formulas.  Cow’s milk is low in iron and vitamin C and has higher protein, sodium, and potassium. 

If you are looking for an option designed with older infants and toddlers in mind, our Enfagrow® Toddler Transitions Infant and Toddler Formula is a good choice. It has DHA, iron and choline, which are building blocks of the brain, and Natural Defense® Dual Prebiotics® blend designed to help support your little one’s digestive health. 

Related: Baby Feeding Timeline

Why are my breasts leaking?

This possibly embarassing situation happens to all of us. For some, just thinking about their baby is enough to turn on the milk machine.

Tips:

  • Apply pressure to your nipples directly with your thumb and index finger.
  • Try crossing your arms tightly across your chest.
  • And wear absorbent breast pads in your bra.

Related: Preparing for Baby: A Checklist for Feeding Success (Not Stress)

Why does breastfeeding make my nipples sore?

Your baby may not be "latching on" correctly. "Latching on" refers to the way your baby attaches her mouth to your breast. If she has latched on properly, she'll get a good flow of milk, and you won't get sore nipples.

You can help your baby latch on by touching her lower lip to your nipple as she roots for your breast. She'll turn toward the side where she is touched. Then, when her mouth is open wide, lift your breast with one hand and pull your baby close to you. Her mouth should attach firmly onto your breast, not just your nipple.

If you're suffering from sore nipples, try these tips to help relieve them:

  • Avoid excessive moisture between feedings.
  • Let your nipples air-dry.
  • Don't use nurturing pads with plastic liners, which can trap moisture.
  • Lotions or lanolin cna help, once the nipple is dry.
  • Try alternating breasts for a few feedings until the condition improves.
  • Also, wash your breasts with warm water and avoid soap, which can be drying.

Related: How to Avoid Common Breastfeeding Issues

Why won't my milk let down?

If you're distracted, tired, stressed, anxious, embarrassed or have pain in your breasts, your milk may not let down.

Tips:

  • Get some rest.
  • Nurse in privacy, and try to release your mind of stressful thoughts and obligations during feeding time.
  • Spend a few moments looking into your baby's beautiful eyes, and let nature take its course.
  • If breast pain is a problem, work with your lactation consultant to reveiw positions and latching on.

Related: How to Avoid Common Breastfeeding Issues
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